If your provider would like to further investigate the possibility of non-small cell lung cancer, one or more of the following diagnostic procedures may be performed:

BRONCHOSCOPY

A small scope (bronchoscope) with a light and camera is inserted down your throat to exam your lungs to look for abnormalities.

COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY (CT)

A donut-shaped piece of equipment uses low dose radiation, either with or without a contrast fluid, to detect abnormalities in the lungs.

ENDOBRONCHIAL ULTRASOUND (EBUS)

A small endoscope is connected to an ultrasound and a needle biopsy of the lymph nodes can be taken with an oral approach through your trachea

FINE NEEDLE BIOPSY

A fine needle biopsy with ultrasound guidance takes tissue samples from the suspicious mass or skin thickening through a thin, hollow needle and sends to pathology.

MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING (MRI)

Provides detailed images of the lungs using magnetic fields to identify any abnormalities that may be cancer.

NAVIGATIONAL BRONCHOSCOPY

Electromagnetic navigation is combined with a bronchoscope to find tumors and take biopsies.

POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY (PET)

A radioactive substance is injected into your bloodstream to collect in cancerous cells and identify the exact location of your cancer.

SURGERY

A surgical or open biopsy involves removing part or all of suspicious mass if the results of a needle biopsy aren’t clear.

Refer a Patient

Refer a Patient

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectur adipig elit.
Refer a Patient

Find a Clinical Trial

Find a Clinical Trial

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectur adipig elit.
See Clinical Trials

Learn More

Learn More

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectur adipig elit.
Learn More